New ePhoto R-640 LED Video 18 Inch Ring Light

For those familiar with the 18" CFL Ring Light (especially those of you who have used it in production), you'll get a kick out this recent product. This new ePhoto R-640 LED Light takes the familiar form factor of the 18" CFL but replaces it with 640 High CRI LED Bulbs.

While I'm a big fan of the 18" CFL (compact fluorescent) version, it always needed to be plugged in to an AC wall outlet (no DC battery option). Also the fragile CFL bulb made it queestionable to travel with and use on location. This new R-640 LED Ring Light solves those issues by offering up long lasting durable LED bulbs and a 14V-15V DC input for optional battery power.

R640 LED Ring Light Test2 R640 LED Ring Light Test1 R640 LED Ring Light Test3
LED tests courtesy of Allied Scientific Pro Lighting Passport

The R-640 claims to use high quality LED bulbs, and our tests with the AlliedScientific Lighting Passport LED Light Meter showed excellent results. Tested at a distance of 3 Feet the R640 delivered a CRI rating of 95 / over 1670 LUX [155 FC] / and a color temp of 5400K. Not just a unique form factor that will allow for creative use, but also a great light at a great price, and for more information visit the product page (click here).

cn-r640-ringlight-for-dslr-filmmaking-1ePhoto r640 cn640 led video lightephoto led video ring light
find-price-button ePhoto R-640 18" LED Video Continous Ring LIght

If it's out of stock, here's a second link available on eBay (click here)

ePhoto R640 LED Video Lightcn-r640-ringlight-for-dslr-filmmaking-1ePhoto r640 cn640 led video light
find-price-button ePhoto R640 LED Video Ring Light







21 thoughts on “New ePhoto R-640 LED Video 18 Inch Ring Light

  1. ATXJin

    Hi, Emm!

    What's the mount that you use or recommend to mount both this light and camera on one tripod and shoot through the ring light?

    Thanks!

  2. Today I used it as a key light with its diffuser attached during an interview where the subject was not looking directly at the light. Worked great. In that case, I wanted it full bright. But to your point, even if you dim it, your subject has to look at 640 points of light. It needs more diffusion.

  3. I was wondering about this light with photos. Are there any samples of the eye close up? I'm wondering how the eye reflection compares to the CFL. I wondered if you could almost see the bulbs in the eye or if there were enough for early be smooth. I couldn't sell from the video but I'm shooting with a D800 and I can really zoom in on an eye. Any thoughts?! Thanks

  4. I purchased this light after reading this post. I was in the market for a ring light for my make up tutorials. This light is surprisingly bright. Brighter than my Fancier Tech 600cn light. It's.. super bright. The color mixes well too and I was able to get a solid white balance with the two. So thanks again, Emm.

  5. I just took delivery of this unique ring light. My first impression that it had a good build quality, and was quite a bit heavier than my fluorescent version of this light. Good and bad - the fluorescent version seems more cheaply made, but it is very easy to carry slung over my shoulder with a bunch of other stuff, it weighs practically nothing. Though the gooseneck may prove useful, my initial thought is that it is an inconvenience. I have never needed this when using my old ring light, I really cannot envision a situation where the simpler and more secure method of just a standard tillable stud clamp wouldn't suffice. I may convert it to this myself if I have time. @Dan - there is a commercially made ring light soft box which is readily available in several online stores - but it's 18" and just slightly too small and the center hole is a bit big for the R300. - so your idea of more diffusion is good. Alienbees makes something called the 'moon unit' which is 30" wide but would probably work with this led ring light. -Keith Moreau

  6. Dan

    Took delivery of one of these 18" 640 LED ring lights yesterday.

    As I shoot through it at test subjects, the overwhelming response is, "Boy is that bright!"

    I had my camera down to ISO 200 and working at about f/5.6 or so.

    The supplied diffusion sock is not quite enough. LEDs are really annoying to look at.

    A lighting manufacturer at NAB 2013 explained to me that LEDs put out most of their energy in the UV spectrum. The way they emit visible light (at least some of them) is to excite tiny amounts of phosphors placed over the LED itself, similar to how a fluorescent lamp excites phosphors deposited on the inner surface of the tube.

    It also means that to be safe, manufacturers need to build in a UV filter. I sincerely believe that we instinctively realize such bright LED light is bad for our eyes and react with a squint.

    Then again, your poor subject also has 640 very bright point sources searing their eyeballs.

    The diffuser helps spread the light a bit, and it works as far as it goes, but my plan is to cut arcs of additional diffusion material and attach them to the light, over the LEDs, under the diffuser sock.

    The gooseneck is functional and the 5/8" socket fits a standard lightstand nicely, though I don't know how long the fine threads of the locking knob will last. With care, it'll be fine. Just don't crank the knob down or you may strip the thread out. Won't be an issue unless you are hanging the light from overhead. On a stand, gravity is your friend.

    What it really lacks is a way to store and transport. It arrives in a square cardboard box about 1-1/2" thick. After you attach the gooseneck, it can't fit back into the box. I don't want to unscrew the gooseneck every time to put the light away, so I'll have to locate a large, flat case of some sort.

    You also need to wrangle the power supply, which has a permanently attached 2.5mm x 5.5mm angled coax power plug with its approx. 2-meter cable on the output side and on the input, a two-prong removable AC cable, also about 2 meters long. The light runs on 15 volts. There's a remote control multi-pin socket, for an optional remote.

    On the back is an on/off rocker switch and a large dimmer knob that gives smooth control of intensity.

    The light is sturdy and, as I said, extremely bright.

    Best part: it really flatters the ladies! Every wrinkle disappears. And that circular highlight in the eyeball is really unique.

    After a very quick test shot this afternoon of a woman friend, my coworker looked at the results and exclaimed, "It makes her look like a model!"

    It's such a different look over "normal" lighting that it's sure to make certain shots really stand out.

    And when the ladies ask me to put the "Remove ten years" filter on, I'll actually be able to do it.

  7. AustrianGeek

    Any chance to get the info where these LEDs are also in use (according the other models)? ^^

  8. Samuel H

    I'm guessing the R-300 won't be anywhere close to the nice image quality of this one: an actual measurement of CRI 95 is AWESOME. Have you measured CRI for the R300?

  9. Emm

    Post author

    @julia - As far as I know there is no such dedicated battery kit. V-mount batteries are an industry standard and this can be used with such. Otheriwse any aftermarket 14v battery can be modified to work such as the Tekkeon packs I have.

  10. julia

    Does anyone know where to find the batter pack for this light? I'm interested to try it out but would prefer to only if I can find the 14V-15V packs VS using a adapter.

    Suggestions?

  11. Brian

    Thanks for finding this Em! I have wanted the Diva ring light for a couple of years now, but the fluorescent bulb
    is a turn off for fragility reasons. Fluorescent is sooo 2010 😉
    In fact, I have swapped out the huge CFL bulbs in my Linco Flora with 100w equiv LED bulbs which are a massive upgrade. No more fragile CFLs and a normal bulb size now for packing. LED bulb prices have come down to being almost equal to CFL ($20 100W eq (22w) LED vs $15 85w CFL)

    I have the R300 but it isn't the same light as an 18" ring light. They are actually different tools. Of course the R300 is brighter. A flashlight will be brighter with all of the LED bulbs massed together than spreading them out 18".

  12. Emm

    Post author

    @pete alexander - If you're already working with V-Mount batteries, you can get a D-tap (P-Tap) cable to power these guys up too. Or if you are working with Sony L series batteries you can also get one of these adapters: http://cheesycam.com/v-mount-adapter-for-sony-l-series-np-f-batteries/

    In this video you can see how i've tapped into the V-Mount battery using a vari volt cable: http://cheesycam.com/indipro-tools-vari-volt-product-giveaway/

    But since you just need straight 14V out, you can find those cables just about anywhere. Here's one that should work directly: http://www.amazon.com/ILED-D-Tap-Cable-Video-Connector/dp/B00D0HPTRO/

  13. If I was smart enough to read/watch carefully each thorough review you've already done on both items, I would've answered my own question! My apologize - no need to answer, appreciate the awesome reviews..keep em' coming! I think I might cop this one!

    Any recommendations on the 14 DC battery pack mentioned? Approx. how long can you run the light on that power pack?

  14. Emm

    Post author

    @pete alexander - Yeah for sure. It's pretty much the same workflow with this light, but now you have the ability to go mobile on battery power and it's more durable with the LED bulbs. If you're still in the Bay, let me know if you want to test it out

  15. Rob S.

    I've owned the older CFL version of this ring light and the R300. The quality of this light is not great. Everything seems fragile so may not hold up to pro use for long whereas the R300 seems a lot more durable. This light also has a gooseneck arm that's screwed into plastic with two small screws. I've never trusted it. The light quality was pretty decent.

  16. OldCorpse

    Thanks, Emm. I actually have an 18" CFL Diva Light, but for the way I use it, the catchlight is not my goal. That said, I guess if you care about the catchlight, you have to ask yourself if you need a catchlight for travel specifically, as that seems to be the advantage of this LED ring light over a CFL right light, otherwise, I get everything from my CFL ring light in studio (without travel) and the R-300 (which can travel, but no catchlight) both. It seems a pretty niche product, but I guess that depends on how one uses it.

  17. Emm

    Post author

    @OldCorpse - You have all great points about the R300 which is an excellent light. I specifically noted to those familiar with working with the 18" CFL because of it's ability to produce an effective catch light. The larger the source light, the more effective the ring light effect will be. This is a desired effect that can't be duplicated by the R300.

    Example:
    20140808-112245.jpg

  18. OldCorpse

    What am I missing here? Why do I want to buy this? I'm comparing it against F&V R-300. The ePhoto is $250, and the F&V is $200 for just the light with a couple filters, or a full package for $300 which is $50 more, but includes not just the softbox and eggcrate, but additional filters. Price-wise it's a wash, but the R-300 is brighter at 3'/1m at 1950 lux vs the ePhoto at 1671 lux. Perhaps the CRI - ePhoto is 95 and R-300 around 85. But I'd like to point out that the power solution on the R-300 is superior, IMHO, because you can use standard Sony batteries that most people have scads of hanging around instead of a special "battery pack" required by the ePhoto. Bottom line, I don't see the ePhoto as offering anything above the R-300, unless you need a larger size ring, or think that the 10 CRI difference is worth the much less brightness of the ePhoto.

  19. Travis W

    Nice price.

    I've always wondered when will be the day I shatter my florescent

    Any battery life tests?

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