BUILD A DIY GIMBAL SUPPORT STABILIZER FOR UNDER $100

If you've ever had a chance to work with a medium to large size Gimbal Stabilizer, you'll know how difficult it could be shooting for more than a few minutes holding the camera at eye level. About one year ago, I presented a basic idea for a DIY Gimbal Support Backpack (read my article here) that could help operators carry the heavy load more comfortably.

Over the past year, there have been many iterations of this idea, and here's the latest (most detailed) build from Rik at RunPlayBack.com. There's so much information presented in the video and in the written article, that I recommend visiting the link for a step by step build process: http://runplayback.com/build-a-diy-gimbal-support-stabilizer-for-under-100.

runplayback diy gimbal support backpack
Runplayback.com - DIY Gimbal Stabilizer Support BackPack





2 thoughts on “BUILD A DIY GIMBAL SUPPORT STABILIZER FOR UNDER $100

  1. Thanks Emm, your original post inspired me to build my own. I've been using it for the past 5 months and it has worked like I charm. My only concern is that the front of the bottom buckle really diggs into my tummy! I use a hiking pack, but would love to find a better padded belt support. Is there any larger padding we could put there?

    Version 1.0 in action with a c300. This baby holds basically everything that the Ronin can.

    Carbon Fiber Chimney Sweeping Poles <---- Super Strong inside of
    Braided Vinyl Tubing inside of
    PVC Tubing with
    PVC Tubing Straps/Wall Connector drilled into
    Plywood inside of a
    Hiking Backpack

  2. Last week I put together one of these, integrating ideas from your build, and this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBa7_xmkz24

    One of the Coleman tent poles split. (the one recommended by Runplayback)

    I was running a Ronin holding a Canon C100 mk1. Part of the way though a half-day shoot, I heard a noise and felt the right side dip down a bit. It still was able to perform but I was really careful for the rest of the shoot to not let it hold all of the weight. When I had a chance to check it out, it had split where the poles connect. Because the connector is not a snug fit, it created a point of high pressure when it was being bent.

    Check out pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/kMg8v

    I plan to try replacing the tent poles with driveway markers, which are solid 4ft fiberglass rods.

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