Tag Archives: lcw

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First off, let's state the obvious! Of course i'm bound to have IR Pollution issues without using a proper 'IR Cut Filter'. But the point of this video is to show that even basic ND Filters that are not advertised with IR Cut can all perform differently, so it's better to test out your filters with specific cameras before heading out to shoot a full project.

I've used my Tiffen Static ND Filters happily on many of my cameras without issues. It's a nice sharp image. But as the BlackMagic Design Ursa Mini 4.6K is more sensitive to IR Pollution this (non-IR Cut) Tiffen ND 1.2 is probably the worst ND Filter you can use with the Ursa Mini 4.6K or other IR Sensitive cameras.

Again, I know none of these filters are advertised as IR Cut and you could probably spend a good amount of money on some special filters. But in this case, the URSA Mini 'without' a filter doesn't seem too bad so you may get away without one. And the LCW Fader ND MKII (though not advertised as IR cut) seems to handle IR Pollution extremely well, so it's a variable ND I can highly recommend. You can find the LCW Fader ND MKII Variable ND via B&H (click here).

Or you can also find the LCW Fader ND MKII Variable ND via Amazon (click here)
Ursa Mini IR Cut Filter Pollution Light Craft Workshop Fader ND MKII
Learn-More-smLight Craft WorkShop Fader ND MKII

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If you love to shoot outdoors on bright sunny days with a shallow DOF, you'll need to get yourself an ND (neutral density) Filter. The ND filter will cut down the amount of light that comes in through the lens so that you can tame that shutter speed, and use a wide aperture without blowing out the image. Still confused? Olivia has a short video that explains how shutter can change the look of your video here: http://vimeo.com/25851113.

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There are static ND filters in various sizes and densities, and then there are Variable ND filters. The convenience of a Variable type ND filter is you can simply dial in how much light you need to block out. Variable ND filters are a two piece glass filter design. Rotate the outer glass, and it will increase/decrease the amount of light passing through.

One important thing to know is that you will get different results from different Variable ND filters on the market. Because the filters are using two pieces of polarizing glass, you could suffer from color cast (reddish/purplish), also color shifting (color temp changes as you rotate the filter), and more importantly Softness of image. The more expensive ones don't suffer as much with these problems, but they can be out of reach for most hobbyist. Of course, I use what I can afford, because in some situations I feel anything is better than nothing. If you're a stickler on quality, or invested thousands of dollars on that Zeiss and Canon 'L series' glass, I think you'll want to try to maintain the best image possible by using something of higher caliber.

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Shown throughout this article is the latest 77mm LCW Digi Pro HD, which on the outer end terminates to a larger 82mm. This step up from 77mm-82mm design prevents obstruction when used on wider lenses. Packaged well, the LCW Digi Pro HD comes with it's own padded case and an 82mm Lens cap if you choose to leave the filter on during storage. To ensure the filter does not accidentally rotate during use and changing exposure, there's a locking pin to hold position.

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Light Craft Workshop was one of the first companies to really hit the DSLR Video market with a quality Variable ND filter about 3 years ago. Since then, they've improved with an Ultra Mark II version, and now has released a much more improved Fader ND Digi Pro HD. The Digi Pro HD filter was first released in a 4x4 filter used in Matte Boxes, and has now been adapted to this variable threaded filter.

I was lucky enough to have this sent over from LCW [Thanks Guys], and will be taking it out for some use. There's no question in my mind that it will provide top quality results, and i'll try to provide some still images at different focal lengths for you all. The new Digi Pro HD filter was just announced a few days ago, and may not yet be available, but you can see all their announcements at their website here: http://LightCraftWorkshop.com. As this Digi Pro HD is not a replacement for some of their other Variable ND products, you can find those products and prices already available at their official store via eBay (click here).

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find-price-button Light Craft Workshop Variable ND & CPL Filters

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I know there's a good amount of new DSLR shooters who haven't invested in ND filters yet, so here's a good example of the difference it can make to improve your DSLR video. To properly exposure on your DSLR you'll primarily be changing either Aperture or Shutter Speed. Since the majority of people love to shoot with a shallow depth of field (wide open aperture), changing the shutter speed is the only other option in bright days. This is where you could really compromise the video quality (unless you're going for that fast shutter look specifically). Get invested into some ND (neutral density) filters to cut down on the light so you can maintain that 'double framerate' rule.

To maintain the sharpest image possible, a single piece of ND glass is your best bet. The problem is that you need to have 1 filter for every sized lens, and you'll also need different densities according to the lighting. If you want to save time in swapping densities, you could get into Variable or Fader ND filters. These are adjustable filters that change densities as you rotate them giving you up to 9 stops in one single filter. Just be careful about the uber cheap ones. Here's a good article about those Variables http://cheesycam.com/variable-nd-filters-fader-filters/.

Here's a variable that i've been using with good results, but price has gone up a bit: http://cheesycam.com/nature-fader-nd-variable-neutral-density-filters/

Single Density ND Filter
find-price-button Single Density ND FIlters ND2, ND4, ND6, ND8

nature-fader-ND-filters
find-price-button Adjustable Variable Density Fader ND Filters

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It's still a bit early, there may be some new things that arrive later, but here's what just came in for today's mail bag. Here's a hint. It could be the next BIG thing to keep your EYE on.... Ok that was probably a corny one liner. Would you like some butter on that corny joke? Yeah that was pretty bad too, i'll quit now. Anyone as excited as me to open the box and see what this bad boy looks like?

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Update 12:18pm: I like it...I really really like it. This isn't saying much since I never bothered to spend over $180 on a viewfinder, but this is the best viewfinder "with a diopter" for under $140. This made my day.. I'll have more information later, but it's a much different design than the other loupes. Weird, but there's no plastic on it. Totally silicone, metal, and glass.

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Lightcraft workshop, probably best known recently for it's Fader ND Variable Neutral Density Filters, but also produces high quality optics for other types of filters is entering the Loupe Game. The new 'BiGeye' LCD Viewfinder for DSLR's is coming in under $140 for the complete setup. Yes, it's weird but they are selling parts of the loupe individually possibly if you happen to damage it, you can cheaply replace small pieces. Cheaper than the Original LCDVF viewfinder, but offering a 'diopter' I think it's priced very nicely. It's not the most beautiful design and I'm not a fan of the name nor the product images they display in their store, but I'm sure they've got the whole optics thing down and that's really what counts. Thanks to Paul Kondo for this tip, you can find the new LCW BiGeye LCD Viewfinder at this link.

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