Tag Archives: fader filter

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If you haven't been keeping up, a few comments have already come in about the Polaroid Variable ND filters. Looks good, and at 1/3 price of relative Variable ND filters. Not every filter size is available, but the popular 72mm is back in stock. http://cheesycam.com/polaroid-new-variable-nd-filters/. Don't get this confused with a 'Circular Polarizer'. This is the 'Variable ND filter' which serves a different purpose in cutting out light. If you can't score the size you need through the Polaroid's, the Nature brand is still an excellent buy as well http://cheesycam.com/nature-fader-nd-variable-neutral-density-filters/

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find-price-button Polaroid Variable Neutral Density Filters

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Just received the Nature brand Neutral Density filter today. It's possibly the cheapest Fader ND on the market right now, so I wanted to see what the quality was like. I picked one up to test on the Canon 85mm F/1.2 which requires a 72mm filter. The Canon 85mm F/1.2L is one of Canon's sharpest lenses in it's lineup. With the lens at 85mm on a Canon cropped camera, you're looking at quite a distance. I was expecting to see extreme softness, which some Variable ND filters can cause, especially over 50mm. This wasn't the case with this Variable ND filter.

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Nature Fader-ND Variable Neutral Density Filters

There is some noticeable difference in sharpness, but not very noticeable unless you're really trying to nitpick, so not bad at all. It's definitely not as soft as my other Fader Filter which is very noticeable when zooming into a subject. Again, i'm asking alot since i'm putting it on an 85mm F/1.2L, but for any wide lens under 50mm, definitely a solid product that will yield excellent results. I'll be posting up some samples of the lens with and without the filter soon for you guys to check out, but i'm very happy with it and will be planning to get a few more. For now the Nature brand Fader ND can be found at this link: Nature Brand Fader ND Variable Neutral Density Filter

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find-price-button Nature Fader ND Variable Filter

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Genus Variable ND Filter

I've collected quite a few lenses (and cameras) in the last year, and it's about time to grab more Variable ND filters instead of swapping them and sharing them during the workflow. Variable ND filters or 'Fader Filters' are Neutral Density filters used to block out light for better exposure. You will find ND filters built in to professional video cameras, but DSLR's lack this and it's an important filter to use when shooting video. Especially if you're trying to achieve a more film like look with your camera, this will help control your shutter speed on bright days. Variable ND filters are great because they are adjustable to perform like several different ND filters wrapped up in one, but if you've got time to add and swap you can use standard ND filters too. There's three big names that come to mind when shopping for these filters which are Singh-Ray most expensive, Genus, and LightCraft Workshop. Here's what you should think about when shopping for your Variable ND Fader Filter.

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77mm Fader ND Mark II

Depending on where you shop, the Genus and LightCraft might be very close in price, but the Singh-Ray is the most expensive by an additional $200+ dollars. Some things to keep in mind when choosing a Variable ND are the quality of the glass used, color temperature change, and vignetting when mounted. These three brands have really good reviews, but I haven't tested them side by side to do a full pixel by pixel comparison.

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Singh-Ray Variable ND Filter

Quality of Glass: For video use on wide lenses, you may not immediately notice a difference, but when using some type of magnified lens (macro and some zooms) you could find loss of sharpness. Especially if used in high megapixel photography, there will definitely be a difference. This is because you are adding an additional 2 pieces of polarized glass over your lens, and the quality of those 2 pieces will affect final image.

Color Temperature Change: Without getting too technical, as you turn the filter it changes the amount of light that is allowed through. Some of these filters could have slight color changes which means you will have to correct your color balance each time. It could be very marginal and even done in post without most people noticing.

Vignetting: The newer versions of these Variable ND filters are built over sized to prevent vignetting. LightCraft calls this their 'Mark II' and Singh-Ray calls this their 'Thin Mount'. So a 77mm lens will end up having something like an 82mm Filter at the tip. This means you will lose the ability to place your stock lens cap and also use of any stock lens hoods. These filters are great for controlling exposure, but shading the front of the lens with a hood or matte box is just as important to maintain contrast and color. Keep in mind about those extra items you'll still need to shop for. If you use the older versions, you should be fine with the lens cap, but most likely not the hood unless you're using an aftermarket mount like the ones in this article: http://cheesycam.com/hoods-covers-caps-and-pouches/. I would definitely think about going with the newer filters with the larger glass, but just beware if you think you've found a cheaper deal, it might be the older version.

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List of Variable ND's at eBay:Variable Neutral Density Filters
List of Variable ND's at BHPhotoVideo: Variable Neutral Density Filters
List of Variable ND's at Amazon: Variable Neutral Density Filters

If you're just experimenting with ND variable filters, there's also a DIY article I posted here where you can make your own. Of course you'll probably suffer some softness, color changes, and vignetting, but for less than $10 dollars it's a great project to jump into. Here's the DIY Link: http://cheesycam.com/diy-fader-nd-variable-nd-filter/

If you're not ready for Variable ND filters, at least grab a set of basic ND filters. Having more than one will allow you to stack them to block more light, or unstack them to allow more light. Just be careful of that vignetting. Click here for a list of Standard Neutral Density Filters.

#####New Product Alert####
Quick Note: There is a new brand of these Variable ND filters showing up online for 'HALF' the price. This is the first time i'm seeing them online, but it looks exactly like one of the brands above. If anyone has tried these, send in some demo videos. I'm going to give a try on one of these to see how it works out. Here's the link: New 'Cheaper' Variable ND Filters
variable-fader-filter
click image for pricing

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I always admit how poorly some of my DIY videos are. Many times I just show beginning, skip middle, straight to the end results. I don't explain clearly how it's all put together. Well if you plan on building that Cheesycam DSLR Cage Fig Rig Stabilizer, you may want to take a look at the video above regarding a few important steps I forgot to provide.

Before you begin your DIY, you'll have to work completely shirtless because that's how Real Men DIY. You need to play some heavy metal rock music in a foreign language, cut steel in a boiler room environment, and grind metal while allowing hot sparks to hit bare skin. That's right 'bare skin'. Yeah that's exactly how I was working on my cage too but I didn't have time to edit that in to my video. Thanks Videonik Pictures, that's the coolest DIY Cage video ever!

Next up, Carlo Zappella caught the article I posted about the DIY Variable ND Filter for about $10 bucks, and whipped up his own. Using a Canon T2i and sticking to 'double the framerate' rule with his Shutter speed around 1/50th, he was still able to maintain excellet DOF without overexposing on this uber cheap DIY Variable ND Fader Filter. They say it's possible to lose some sharpness depending on the filters you buy, but I didn't notice anything. It looks much better than without a variable ND that's for sure. They also say it could change color tone depending on the filters you use, but Carlo threw in the Magic Bullet Looks and it came out great. He's also using a DIY Slider for the slow sliding shots, similar to mine here.

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