Tag Archives: Canon


Amazon has a good number of Lightning Deals on the Rokinon 50mm F/1.5 Cine Lens, 7.5mm Fisheye, and 12mm F/2.0 Wide Angle. These deals are only scheduled to go by very fast, so make sure to check on these products at the scheduled time.

2:50pm (PST) - Amazon Lightning Deal on Rokinon 7.5mm Fisheye Lens for Sony E Mount (found here).

rokinon 7.5 fisheye sony
find-price-button Rokinon 7.5mm Fisheye Lens Sony NEX Sony E Mount

3:50pm (PST) - (Nikon mounts can easily be adapted to fit Canon EOS, M43, etc.). Lightning Deal on Rokinon 50mm T/1.5 Cine Lens for Nikon Mount

rokinon 50mm cine lens nikon canon
find-price-button Rokinon 50mm T/1.5 Cine Lens Nikon Mount

4:50pm (PST) - Great for Fuji X-Mount cameras, but this lens cannot be adapted. Lighting Deal on Rokinon 12mm F/2.0 wide Angle Fuji-X Mount.

rokinon 12mm F 2 Fuji X
find-price-button Rokinon 12mm F/2.0 Fuji X Mount

4:50am (PST) - Lighting Deal on Rokinon 50mm T/1.5 Cine Lens for Canon Mount (here)

rokinon 50mm cine lens nikon canon
find-price-button Rokinon 50mm T/1.5 Cine Lens Canon Mount


Over the past few weeks you've probably seen a few of these MustHD LCD monitors pop in in some of my videos. Here's a closer look at two specific models and what the M-701 (7 inch) and M-501 (5 inch) monitors have to offer.

According to Camera Motion Research "MustHD monitors have a full feature set and great build quality, including the excellent removable folding sun shade, battery plate and battery locking, and HDMI cable locks. Color accuracy out of the box, particularly on the M701 is outstanding. They are the best performing monitors we have found at a very affordable price."

M-701 Color Accuracy Test

Besides offering a detachable sun hood, an HDMI lock, and HDMI pass through, each monitor can accept three different optional battery plates for Sony, Canon, or Panasonic and share similar software features such as Focus Peaking, False Color, Black and White, Blue Only, Zoom, and more. For an entire specification sheet of each model, check out the http://CamotionLLC.com website (found here).

find-price-button MustHD LCD Monitors M-701 & M-501


Excited about the new Canon 5D Mark III announcements? It's been rumored all over the web that they may have an official statement by end of the week - possibly this Friday. Although I might be excited about better video quality, I have to admit there's a part of me that already knows this new camera will still have it's limitations around video. Canon makes no secrets about purposely limiting their DSLR line of cameras so that it doesn't cannibalize their true high end video line.

Still waiting for this final camera to be released from Canon, i'm on hold about the FS100. Once I know the specs on the Canon 5D Mark III, i'll have a better idea on which direction i'll be going for the next year. With Canon's EF or EF-S lenses, aperture needs to be controlled electronically. Having invested in so many Canon EF lenses, if you wanted to adapt it to the MFT cameras, you could use something like the RedRock Live Lens adapter (seen here).

Sony FS100 Super35 Camcorder
find-price-button NEX-FS100UK Super 35mm Sensor Camcorder

One solution to using Canon EF lenses on a Sony E-Mount is the Metabones adapter. This adapter translates the controls in a Sony camera to communicate with a Canon lens. The first release of this adapter had issues with cameras like the Sony NEX-7, so I held off until things got squared away. The latest firmware version 2.0 in the adapter now supports the NEX-7 so you'll be able to control the aperture values in the lens direct from the camera. It's a rare piece right now, and are constantly out of stock over at their website (found here).

If you're trying to adapt lenses to a smaller Micro Four Thirds or Sony E-Mount there are cheaper Fotodiox Adapters (like these), but you might also want to consider the slightly more expensive Metabones, as they make some great quality adapters to fit Nikon, Canon, Leica lenses, etc. (click here).

find-price-button Metabones Lens to Camera Adapters

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For those who wonder why some lenses cost more than others, here's a look behind how Leica does it. For those of you who are Canon fans, you might want to set some time aside and take a look at how Canon assembles the 500mm http://cheesycam.com/wonder-why-lenses-cost-so-much/. Imagine all the other 'L' lenses...

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Next time you see these barcodes, you can scan it with your mobile device to get instant access to information, websites, videos, and more with Microsoft Tags. Microsoft Tags are a new kind of colorful bar code that can be 'scanned' from your smartphone, giving you near instant access to web pages with detailed information about the product to help you make a purchase decision, including Ratings & Reviews from others who already own it. Once you install the free application, you simply launch the app on your smartphone, point your phone at the Tag, line it up in the crosshairs - and depending on your phone - either wait for it to scan the Tag or snap it yourself as if you were taking a picture.


All the information you'll need to get started can be found here: http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/standard_display/microsoft_tag?WT.mc_id=EM1104CG01007&RID=1-184AEK&CON=1-2B31-780&PRO=&CID=1-14P1Y1


find-price-button Tokina AT-X 16-28mm F2.8 Pro FX Lens for Canon and Nikon

I've been extremely happy with my new Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8 lens for both video and photography use, but it doesn't work across all my cameras. Sure it mounts to the Canon 5D Mark II, but it's pretty much unusable on a full frame camera until you zoom all the way out. If you're looking for a lens that would give you a wider option on a full frame you might already be thinking about Canon's 16-35mm F/2.8. This would work on both Full Frame and cropped cameras, but you'll also be looking at an "L" lens price tag.

Tokina's giving us a new option with their recently released 16-28mm F/2.8 lens. This new 16-28mm F/2.8 lens from Tokina was specifically designed to be compatible with all cameras (including Full Frame). This new lens also features the company's newly developed AF system that features a quieter Silent Drive-Module (SD-M) autofocus motor and promises more precise focusing. The company also designed it to be a weather-sealed lens with a fixed lens hood. Still an expensive lens, but at about $700 cheaper than Canon's 16-35mm it adds in another option for budget shooters looking for an extra wide fast lens for both video and photography. BTW, they've also made it available for both Canon and Nikon, no news for Sony (yet).


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Monday's mail bag contains my two Sima L Brackets referencing this article I posted not long ago http://cheesycam.com/double-l-bracket-configuration-alzo-t-pod/. I went with the Sima as it was cheaper than the Alzo L Bracket. It feels real solid and has the dual shoe mount. I'll have more information on what I plan on doing with these when I get my aluminum flat bar cut out.

Here's an image of the Canon T2i with Sima L Bracket next to my Zoom H1 Portable Audio recorder.
IMG_8270 - Copy

Sima Video Bracket with Handle + 2 Accessory Mounts

Next up, received the package from bhphotovideo.com . No it's not my Zoom H1 Portable Digital Audio Recorder, that's coming in the mail tomorrow. This box contains some very special lenses. I recently shot at the Craigslist Foundation Boot camp, and was requested to shoot the conference event speeches with DSLR's. Normally I would have opted for a Sony EX1, or Panasonic HVX for longer running video clips, but we were able to shoot with the Canon 5D Mark II using multiple camera angles and overlapped recording. The only problem we ran into was the range of the lenses. Shooting off to the side and wanting the closest possible headshot, my Canon 70-200mm F/2.8 on the full frame just didn't cut it. With the Canon 2x Teleconverter on, we got closer, but the aperture minimum now up F/5.6 (the converter does this) plus the dim lit theater combination had us up to ISO 1600 at the least.

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So after every shoot I think about what lenses could make this so much easier and provide better quality, still keeping in mind it has to be at an affordable price. Having a telephoto lens is important for this type of coverage, so prime lenses would be out of the question. I needed to zoom in and zoom out for wider shots as they traveled the stage. For low light, I needed something that had at least a comparable aperture of F/5.6. So I narrowed down cost + functionality to two lenses. The Canon 100-400mm F/4.5-5.6L with IS & the new Sigma 50-500mm F/4.5-6.3 with optical stabilization. Yes the Sigma stops down to 6.3 at the longest 500mm, but as a comparison i'll see if I can get 5.6 at 400mm with the Sigma. Both priced roughly around $1600 US Dollars i'll have the lens vs. lens comparison up this week......
Canon Zoom Telephoto EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS (Image Stabilizer) USM Autofocus Lens

Sigma 50-500mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM APO Autofocus Lens


In reference to my recent post about the new Nikon Replica Lens Mug with Zoom capability that I received, here's some images. The details on these replicas are incredible. Also there's some images of my other Canon Replica Lens mugs. The 24-105mm Lens mug you see in the gallery is the old one. The new Canon 24-105mm F/4 Replica Lens mug now has a stainless steel insert. Images were shot in my Product Cocoon with a Canon 580 EX II speedlight on each side triggered by my Canon ST-E2 transmitter. Images are a bit underexposed, but it's about midnight, and hopefully these should be good enough to give you an idea of the quality and detail of the Nikon 24-70mm Replica Zoom Lens Coffee Mug with Stainless Steel insert

find-price-button Nikon Coffee Mug Telephoto Zoom

find-price-button Canon Lens Mug Coffee Mug Replica Telephoto Zoom



About 2 months ago JJ @ OrangeWeddingFilms.com posted a video stating he was going to put together a test between the Canon 24-70mm F/2.8, Sigma 24-70mm F/2.8, and the Tamron 28-75mm F/2.8 in Video use. Looks like he's posted a few first samples just yesterday and in some cases you do see difference in Contrast, color, and sharpness. I personally like the Canon 24-70mm F/2.8, but if you're happy with the results, you can save a bit of money on the other non Canon brands. Here's the break down on lenses, prices, and what you're comparing.

First up Canon 24-70mm F/2.8 Wide Telephoto priced at approx $1349.00
click image to find at bhphotovideo.com

Second Lens is the Sigma 24-70mm F/2.8 Macro priced at approx $569.00
click image to find at bhphotovideo.com

Third Lens in the test is the Tamron Zoom Wide Angle-Telephoto AF 28-75mm f/2.8 priced at $499.00
click image to find at bhphotovideo.com

To follow up on his first review against these lenses, i've owned them all at one point. I still have the Canon 24-70mm F/2.8. Sigma makes some really great lenses, I still rock my Sigma 20mm all the time. I started with the Sigma 24-70mm F/2.8 before my Canon L, using it for photography. Compared to the Canon it was slower on auto focus, more noise when focusing, and problems with communication when using Infrared metering from my Speedlite. This is when I upgraded to the Canon 24-70mm F/2.8 L. The Sigma 24-70mm F/2.8 of course is half the price of the Canon 24-70mm, so if you're looking for a strictly Video lens with this range, all these quirks might not be a problem for you. If you're a hybrid shooter of both Photo and Video, you'll get better performance and image quality from the Canon.

I'm not going to get deep into the Tamron lens, I love Tamron lenses like my 18-270mm as my travel lens choice, but if you're going to be dealing with the weather, this is where the Canon 24-70mm L lens proves it's worth. Many of the cheaper lenses provide decent image quality at an affordable price, but lack the weather sealing, quiet motor, and fast autofocus. I had problems with an earlier lens (I won't mention any brands) shooting in light fog which crept into my lens and pretty much ruined it with moisture from the inside. Again, if you're just doing strictly video and not worried about auto focus noise & weather, you'll find great deals in the Sigma and Tamron brands, and also Tokina which isn't part of this test because they don't have a lens available in this range.

Update: Just confirmed with JJ that his test was using the older Sigma 24-70mm F/2.8. There is another more silent and higher end 24-70mm F/2.8 HSM priced at about $899.00 from Sigma that has not been tested. This is said to be a close rival to the Canon 24-70mm F/2.8.
click image to find at bhphotovideo.com