Tag Archives: 7D

25 Comments

YouTube member Bandticker gives a tour on the recent View Finder to hit the market called the VF Prime. This view finder has a large eyecup and -/+ 4 diopter which most lower end view finders lack. It's been featured on a few different websites, has received some excellent reviews. In this video there's a mention of it fitting a T2i, but with a different sized LCD you may have a 1mm crop on each side. Something people are more than willing to accept for a decent view finder. Should fit Canon 5D Mark II, 7D, and Nikon DSLR's with 3" LCD perfectly. Can be found on eBay here: VF Prime LCD View Finder for 3" Canon Nikon DSLR

Or via Amazon Below

VF Prime
find-price-button VF Prime DSLR Camera LCD Viewfinder for 3" LCD

95 Comments


vfinder
find-price-button New LCD View Finder for Canon T2i, 5D Mark II, 7D and other 3″ LCD’s

Ok, I received this earlier in the mailbox but got caught up in a long shoot today. I'll get back in the studio tomorrow to shoot some photos comparing it with other viewfinders, but I wanted to at least point you guys to this new line of viewfinders. These photos are from the store. Quality is great for the price. If you were happy with the LCDVF 'clones', you'll be even more happy with this version, especially since even the clones are over priced now.

A great looking design with different versions available to support the T2i LCD's (which means 60D aspect), and a version for the Canon 5D Mark II & 7D. I'm not a Nikon shooter, but I believe if it's a standard 3 inch LCD, the proper 3" version (5DM2 version) should work fine. It comes with a very large soft comfortable eyecup (that you don't need to buy seperately), and i'll test later if it works with my Blue Star eye cushion too. The magnets are different than the cheap stuff and feels very solid. There's some notches on the metal frame I believe helps keep the item from shifting and coming loose. I'll have to test the fit on a GH2 to see what that looks like.

carryspeed-vfinder

t2i-viewfnder

large-eye-cup
find-price-button New LCD View Finder for Canon T2i, 5D Mark II, 7D and other 3" LCD's

Also Available via Amazon
carry-speed-amazon-viewfinde
New LCD View Finder for Canon T2i, 5D Mark II, 7D and other 3″ LCD’s

10 Comments

The fact that the Canon 60D uses the same batteries as the 5D Mark II & Canon 7D was both a blessing and a curse. For those who already had these batteries, it's nice not having a different set of batteries and charger to add to your gear list. A single OEM LP-E6 will run you well over $70 dollars. For those who are looking to buy extra ones, prices on aftermarket LP-E6 batteries seem to have inflated. There was one brand on Amazon that dropped their decoded (chipped batteries that communicate with camera to show battery life) batteries down to $18.00 dollars, but now brought them back up to $60 bucks!. Yeah they know that there's a new market out for these batteries after the Canon 60D release.

If you don't care about the battery meter, there's plenty of Aftermarket LP-E6 batteries that run around (2)pcs. for $15 dollars. Very very cheap, but they will need their own charger. It's not suggested these be charged on the OEM charger. I think I have 6 of those myself which still run to this day, and are probably a year old or more.

There's two brands on Amazon for 'decoded' batteries still showing around $22 dollars, and a few Aftermarket LP-E6 Decoded Batteries on eBay for around $15.00 each.

I was still waiting for more reviews on these items to see if they will actually work well and hold up as good batteries, and if the battery meter really works. A friend of mine has a wedding lined up on 10/10/10 - of course the most popular wedding day this year, and so he's invested into the Maxtek Replacement Li-ion Battery For Canon. He's had it a short while and seems to work exactly like OEM, and charges on the OEM charger (can't do this with un-chipped batteries). I've asked him to give us a demo video of the batteries in use, but he says they work exactly the same. This battery is compatible with the Canon 5D Mark II, Canon 7D, and Canon 60D.

decoded-battery
Decoded Batteries Starting at $15.00
2x-batteries
2x Un-chipped LP-E6 starting at $15.00

54 Comments

Now that Canon is throwing everyone for a loop releasing every 'in between' type of camera, I just thought i'd throw up a video about a few differences in the Canon 7D vs 60D vs T2i. I too was quite disappointed that Canon didn't release any earth shattering news about new video features on their latest camera. For 5DM2 and 7D owners, the announcement of the 60D was nothing to get too overly excited about. When it was between the T2i and 7D I advised all my friends starting in DSLR video to go with the T2i, save the extra $1000 dollars and buy yourself some better glass. Now the 60D is coming in at just $300 dollars more than the T2i, I'm going to change my tune. For Canon T2i owners who said they wouldn't, I think once you've used it and seen what it can do, you'll make a decision to upgrade.

There are some really nice features for videographers that will instantly improve what you're already doing with the T2i. For one, the White balance settings on the 60D are way easier to control than the T2i, and adds the option for manual Kelvin settings. The Flip out LCD you might be able to live without (I think it's really nice), but the Manual Audio levels are well worth the extra $300 dollars alone. Why bother with an external Audio recorder when you can connect a microphone directly and manually adjust audio levels in the camera? You shoot hundreds of tiny little clips throughout the day and when you come home, you have nothing to sync. You change your settings to 24p to get that cinema look, and instead of running hundreds of clips through Plural Eyes, all that work is already done. This already will save you hours and hours of post work. Sure you can defeat AGC on the other cameras, but in doing so, you'll already be spending a few hundred dollars on a decent device. The upgraded body already puts the 60D in a different class. It's no longer a lightweight Rebel camera, the 60D feels sturdy with a bit more weather proofing. We're not even talking about all the Photography upgrades, so for beginner Hybrid shooters the decision should be easy regarding the $300 dollar price difference.

canon-eos-family-1

I was surprised that Canon didn't release any new video features like 120fps or at least 1080@60fps, but not surprised Canon released another camera with obvious Video dedicated ergonomic upgrades. Having spent an extra $1000 dollars for their first 1080 DSLR Video camera, there were thousands of Canon 7D owners who were shocked when the Canon T2i was first announced. I think the announcement of the 60D for just a few hundred dollars more appeals to T2i owners in the same way. Overall the Canon 60D is indeed a great camera at a great price, and Canon has made great strides in adding more professional video features, audio features, photography features, and body upgrades into a more affordable camera.

12 Comments

I was cruising the web and ran into Jared Abrams from Cinema5D.com showcasing the Swintronix PowerBase 70 Power Pack for the Canon 5D Mark II & Canon 7D. This is a pretty cool solution for those who are concerned about battery power and want to make sure you're running all day. Not a bad price for a unit that claims to hold the same power as 5-6 Canon LP-E6 batteries, and also has output options to power other equipment too.

Most people might not remember this, but long ago Digital Cameras used standard AA batteries, not rechargeable Lithiums. Battery technology was poor and run time was terrible, so you really tried not reviewing your images on the LCD. I remember owning an older camera that had the option to plug into an AC outlet. The brick converted AC back into DC for the camera. So I fashioned up a relative Voltage RC Car battery as my mobile power source. Worked great, dirt cheap, fast recharging, and lasted much longer than AA batteries. Ask around, you'll be surprised how many photographers are using RC car batteries for many projects.

swintronix-power-pack-canon
Swintronix Powerbase 70 Battery Pack Kit

Note: Don't follow my Lead. This could be a disastrous project.
My mind is wandering and I'm going to stir up some thought here about a possible DIY power pack for the Canon 5D Mark II. Taking a peek at the Swintronix PowerBase 70, I believe it has a rating for 14 volts but the Canon LP-E6 Battery is only rated at 7.2 volts. This sounds like there are (2) 7 volt batteries in this PowerBase. The 14 volts can be offered if these two 7 volt batteries are run in Series. Extended run times can be offered if these two 7 volt batteries are run in Parallel.

Here's the simple parts needed for a possible DIY Power Pack for the Canon 5D Mark II or 7D. First a way to connect power into the Camera. Available is an aftermarket ACK-E6 AC Power Adapter designed specifically for LP-E6 cameras like the 5D Mark II & 7D. This very specific adapter seperates from the 'Brick' leaving you with a simple adapter, not to be confused with the ones that don't seperate from the power brick. I won't need the brick, just the Battery adapter part with short wire lead.

ack-e6-power-adapter
click image

Second, just one 7.4v Lithium Rechargeable Battery will do the job powering up the camera, but if I want longer run times, i'll need to run two 7.4v batteries in Parallel. The single Canon LP-E6 Battery is rated at approx 7v 1800mah -aftermarket batteries around 1500mah. To make this worth carrying around, each 7.4v battery should have at least twice the milliamp hour rating if not more. The battery image below shows almost double the milliamp hour rating from the stock battery, so it's possible it may last twice as long.
lithium-rc-battery-7-volt
click image

Outside of those two parts, i'd need to take a short trip to Radio Shack for some wire adapter to mate the two, a decent looking electronics project box for the enclosure, and 7.4v battery charger for RC cars to recharge. I think it's quite possible to create a DIY Power Pack for the Canon 5D Mark II or 7D for a Total price roughly under $125 dollars. I really don't see why I need to make something like this, i'm just thinking out loud as usual.

184 Comments

As soon as I announced I was going to test the Glidecam HD1000, many people have been leaving me messages waiting. So here's my quick run through, i'm sure you all know how to assemble and balance these things. There's already plenty of video tutorials on balancing, so i'm just going to show you sample use of the HD1000. Thanks for my sister-in-law for allowing me to chase her around while she (not very skilled) rides a skateboard around to show fast moving shots. Yes I was lightly jogging with the Glidecam HD1000 and Canon 5D Mark II + Sigma 20mm F/1.8.

I did a demo of the Glidecam 2000 Pro, and now I normally fly the Glidecam HD4000 which is a beast, but truly a top performer when loaded up. I love the Glidecam HD4000, but sometimes it's a bit overkill. The way I have the Glidecam HD4000 setup, I wouldn't want to run that way without my Steadicam Merlin Vest. So I wanted to really push the smallest Glidecam to see how much weight it can carry. It can balance the 5D Mark II + Sigma 20mm F/1.8 using all the available weights (compact mode). If you extend the base further down, you can shift the center of balance making it more bottom heavy and possibly add-on a very small LED light or Sennheiser MKE400 microphone.

Can you fly with LED light, Microphone, and Zoom H4n + Canon T2i + wide prime lens? Don't quote me on this! I've flown the Glidecam 2000 pro, the HD4000, and now the HD1000. The gimbal handle on the Glidecam stabilizers are very very strong and very fluid even when loaded up. In fact, I think they fly better when they are pushed to their weight capacity limits. Although they won't suggest this I really think you can further 'modify' this unit to accept even more weights at the bottom and really fly a heavy setup with accessories. Yes you can easily move up to the HD2000 or HD4000, but i'm looking for the most compact video stabilizer solution possible. So if it's possible to really load up this HD1000 then i'll be stoked, because you can see how nice and tiny this thing is, making it perfect for travel and tight locations.

Again, this is a bit more pricey than those other stabilizers i've shown, but it's really the best bang for your buck. Most people either don't like flying footage, or don't shoot enough of flying footage to justify the price. If you really like the look, want or need something super fast to balance, you can get away with the HD1000. If you'll be adding some further accessories and added weight this will push you to the HD2000 at least. So don't quote me on the HD1000 being able to handle everything, this is something i'm still working on, and hopefully i'll demo that soon. Glidecam makes great stabilizers. If you've been following my videos, I started with my DIY stabilizer, moved to the Steadicam JR., then to the Steadicam Merlin, tested the Glidecam 2000 Pro, Hague MMC, IndieHardware Stabilizer, Glidecam HD4000, and now Glidecam HD1000. I've tried many and i'm very satisfied with the quality, price point, and fast balance design of the Glidecam HD stabilizers. (HD version! Not Pro models, those kinda suck to balance).

NOTE: Besides being able to carry more weight, the handle has a much broader range of movement. You'll notice several 'Tilt' shots in this video as I point downwards going down the stairs, or point downwards at the skateboard. This type of Gimbal handle also allows for shots pointing upwards or sideways. This was one of the main reasons I left the Steadicam Merlin since it couldn't support these type of shots.

Glidecam has made it very easy to choose from 3 different DSLR stabilizers depending on your needs. I'm not an expert, you should always consult support with the respected manufacturers, but if you have any questions i'd be happy to try and answer them. Here's a link to the Glidecam HD1000 if anyone is interested in dishing out a paycheck to grab one.
If you are planning to balance heavier setups, you can find more information about the other Glidecam HD series stabilizer, how much weight each stabilizer can carry, along with prices following the links below.

glidecam-hd1000
find-price-button Glidecam HD 1000 Smallest Glidecam HD DSLR Video Camera Stabilizer

Glidecam-HD2000
find-price-button Glidecam HD 2000 Medium Sized Glidecam HD DSLR Video Camera Stabilizer

Glidecam-HD4000
find-price-button Glidecam HD-4000 Largest Glidecam HD DSLR Video Camera Stabilizer

2 Comments

550d-waterproof-housing

Wow, awesome stuff here by NauticamUSA.com. Yeah first time i've heard about them too! Maybe because I was never crazy enough to take my gear underwater. The rig looks pretty sick and they've got something for the Canon 7D as well. I believe there is a Nikon D90 in there too, but who cares. JK Nikonians!! (sorta). Hopefully they'll be flattered that i've 'borrowed' a few images from their galleries to showcase it to you to guys. Hey it's free advertising Nauticam, now if only I can get one to review...hint hint nudge nudge. You can find way more cool photos of these rigs in the water, cool video samples, plus other housings at their website http://nauticamusa.com

These things look soo cool, i'd run around with them 'out of water'!

16 Comments

This remote cord + wireless remote combo was dirt cheap and I had to have it. I use these when i'm doing my Pole Photography (blogged about it earlier), so that I can trigger the camera while it's about 12' feet in the air. They work on multiple types of Canon Cameras. Check out the video on how cool these things are. I bought mine from this seller. These work much better than the RC1 infrared type remotes. Click here to purchase for as little as $16.00 dollars + Free Shipping!


find-price-button Canon 7D and 5D Mark II Wireless Shutter Remote

3 Comments

I thought this was old news and everyone was already using these. I purchased these batteries just weeks after the Canon 5D Mark II was announced! Yeah they are pretty old, but still rocking and rollin'. Apparently after posting my aftermarket battery video for the 550D & T2i, I received many questions on the 5DM2 / 7D aftermarket batteries.

So these batteries work differently. They don't charge on OEM canon chargers, and they don't display battery life. Other than that they are dirt cheap and work just as long (i think so). I'm also using aftermarket China 'battery grips' on both my 5D Mark II & 7D. Prices have gone up a bit. I purchased mine for about $10.00 dollars. The Canon 5D Mark II and 7D use the same type of batteries. I purchased mine from this seller. It's going for about $14.00 dollars. Click this link to purchase.


find-price-button Canon non-chipped batteries

Battery Grips for Canon Cameras can be found here:
Canon Grip
find-price-button Canon Aftermarket Battery Grips