camera slider


360VM Camera Slider

Anything over a 3ft. slider becomes cumbersome for a small crew, and longer sliders start requiring additional stands to set up. I prefer working with sliders around 3' max. Take a look at this 28" 360VM slider with belt and crank pulley. Yup, similar to that of the V1 Kessler Pocket Dolly which used to sell for upwards of $600+ dollars. A similar CamTree/ProAim version with crank pulley still runs well over $400+. Your most basic IGUS DIY rail at this width could run you about $200+ without the crank setup. That's what makes the price on this 360VM slider pretty competitive with the current offerings. There's absolutely no reason to go with anything much larger, especially for those migrating to smaller camera setups like the new Sony NEX-5n, NEX-7, Olympus EP-3, etc.

Here's a video below that shows the actual 360VM slider in use, and is seen in the video.

Putting a Crank and Pulley on one of IGUS' widest rails was mostly known through Kessler's Pocket Dolly V1.
Some of those videos found here:
Another Example here:

The installed pulley makes it even sweeter for those looking to set up a motorized motion controlled video dolly. A simple motor and reversible PWM speed controller, and you're good to go. The 28" Crank slider can be found on the website here:, but there may also be a longer version found here:

360VM crank slider
find-price-button 360VM Video Camera Slider with Belt Crank Pulley


Jared Abrams from WideOpenCamera gives us a sneak peek at Jag35's new Headquarters and their new motion control slider. Jag35 has been pumping out quite a bit of gear in the last few months including their inexpensive electronic and wireless follow focus systems. Find more about their products over at


Using the GoPro in odd ways. DIY suction mount to the hood of a car, on a monopod as a Golf Putter, and did you know it fits perfectly inside a Golf Hole? Playing with the Konova Camera Slider out on the course. Just total randomness and plain fun.

find-price-button GoPro HD WaterProof Cameras

Konova Slider
find-price-button Konova Roller Bearing Video Camera Slider

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Submitted by YouTube member detomaso4ag, here's a simple method to create your DIY Mini Video camera track dolly. For those who don't mind the skate wheels on a pipe track it's a cheap solution to getting smooth gliding camera movements. The trick is getting the wheels drilled in perfectly to the angle iron. If you're slightly off, then the dolly will wobble down the track. For those who aren't ready to tackle the DIY, these mini dollies already exist, found below.

find-price-button Mini Video Camera Track Dolly


When you need to support a bit of weight for a new 4ft Jib / Crane or Camera Slider, you'll need a solid base. As an inexpensive solution i've been suggesting the FT9901SLV. I have no issues with this tripod under my short 3 foot Konova slider or the latest 4ft. Glideshot crane, but under heavier loads (like my 8ft. crane), the 75mm bowl mount can slip.

Davis Sanford FM18 Head
(Above) Davis & Sanford FM18 Fluid Head

To carry the most amount of weight, you'll need to grab a set of sticks and a fluid head that isn't based on the bowl mount like this Davis & Sanford (Owned by Tiffen Company) ATPG18 w/ FM18 Fluid Head. Normally sold on Amazon and other spots for about $240, B&H has a decent price drop (Limited Quantity) on this beefy set of ATPG18 All Terrain legs with Geared Center Column, and heavy duty FM18 fluid head. Not a bead deal while they last...

Davis Sanford FM18 Fluid Head Tripod
find-price-button Davis & Sanford ATPG18 w/ FM18 Fluid Head


Roller bearing sliders have a love/hate relationship. Some people love the smooth no friction action, and some people hate the inconsistencies they might get without friction. Thanks for Martin for tipping me off on this review. YouTube member AYFilms gives us a review of the Camtree Micro Dolly. We've all seen IGUS Drylin based sliders, but with this Camtree Micro Dolly version they provide an optional pulley system. They are also using one of the widest rails available from IGUS which handles much better than the smaller and narrower versions.

Camtree Micro Dolly Slider Pulley IGUS

The IGUS rails work on dry (plastic-like) bearings that actually slide (not roll) across the rail. One thing to keep in mind with these friction sliders is you want to center the weight as best as possible. Too much over the side and you'll have unequal tension. The pulley system not only offers additional tension to make sliding more consistent, but pulls the carrier from the lowest point to provide less binding. As mentioned in the video, with the pulley crank removed, you're pretty much 80% the way to making a motorized slider or motion controlled timelapse rig. The Camtree Micro Dolly comes with Pulley system, Quick Release Adapter, and Foam padded Travel Case.

Camtree IGUS Pulley Slider
find-price-button Camtree Micro Dolly IGUS Slider w/ Pulley


If you have the means, the space, and the transportation, ladder track dollies are a great solution for camera movement. Rod shows how he's picked up a set of ready-made 'bolt on' dolly wheels to a simple plywood board to create an 8ft dolly capable of carrying a good amount of weight. In smaller more confined situations a slider is a must, but there's plenty of benefits to using a wider platform for stability in your shots.

find-price-button717A Fluid Head Used on Dolly

These dolly wheels are designed to run on pipes as well, but when possible using a Ladder will provide a very firm solution that can be laid out in just about any type of terrain (gravel, grass, mud) and still maintain a super rigid track - unlike long PVC pipes. In this older article you can see how a ladder was used for a DIY Timelapse rig:

If you're intersted in building your own dolly system, you could try some angle iron and at least 8 skate wheels + bearings, but if you're slightly off in drilling it's going to cause you quite a bit of wobble. To make things easier, these wheels that Rod is using are an inexpensive solution.

Dolly Wheel Assembly
find-price-button Bolt On Dolly Track Wheel Assembly


We all DIY with what's available, convenient, and affordable. One of those materials is found in the household section in your local grocery mart. I tell ya, IKEA must be making a killing on cutting board sales. First seen on a DIY DSLR Rig, and then played a small part on a Slider, and now here's another DIY camera slider from Vimeo member TaQ Inoue.

I'm not sure it's an actual IKEA cutting board, but you can get the same hefty material there in large sizes. It's cheap, easy to cut, carve, drill, and shape. Not very clear on the details or specs here, but it's a good excuse to creatively shoot the project from beginning to end. Overall costs stated at $30 dollars. It also seems to be working out fairly well in his example video 'Littlest Mountains 2 Trailer'.